The History Of Michael “Blackie” Gejeian

The Man Behind The Fresno Dragway, Autorama, and Legendary Emperor roadster

By Michael Dobrin   –   Photography By the Author, the Blackie Gejeian Collection & Tim Burman

Haulin’ north on the 99, November 1967. Headed for the last drag race, a Super Stock showdown between “Dandy” Dick Landy in his blueprinted Dodge Hemi and Butch “The California Flash” Leal in his Coronet street Hemi. The race would run at Fresno Dragway in Raisin City, California.

02 Blackie framed here by a gutted 1935 Ford Coupe
“Nobody beat me on tonnage per acre or the quality of my raisins,” boasted farmer Blackie. Ever competitive, he devoted tons of energy to his spread near Fresno. He’s framed here by a gutted 1935 Ford Coupe, his vineyard spreading to the horizon.
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I was ending a long national tour as the advance man for Landy’s Dodge factory racing team, and I had a date with the Dragway promoter, one Michael Gejeian.

Landy handed me his phone number. “Call him Blackie.”

03 Fast 7 Ford coupe was sponsored by local Bowes Seal Fast distributor and Fresno racing official Smokey Hanoian
Ranchin’ and racin’. From 1953-55, Blackie was a consistent short track hardtop winner at races between San Jose and Fresno. His fast #7 Ford coupe was sponsored by local Bowes Seal Fast distributor and Fresno racing official, Smokey Hanoian.

The noonday meeting took place at a rural roadhouse with high ceilings, leather booths, and worn oaken veneers. The place was packed with dozens of working men in working clothes, eating, smoking, playing cards, and drinking red wine out of stubby glasses.

04 Blackie points to the site of his first racing enterprise Blackies Speed Shop 1948
Blackie points to the site of his first racing enterprise, “Blackie’s Speed Shop, 1948,” that was etched into a concrete slab at the Gejeian ranch near Easton. Photographed, 1995.
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A shimmer of sun cut the dust and a commanding figure walked in; he wore Levis and a torn, mud-streaked T-shirt. His curly, coal-black hair crowned a brow covered with sweat. He was animated; his voice alone commanded the smoky proceedings. He was unlike any promoter I’d met across America. He’d gotten off his tractor and we could do our business tomorrow. Just call. One final impression: he had golden tiger eyes that glowed with ethereal intensity.

05 Blackie and his daughter Diane pose with another hardtop racing trophy circa 1954
Blackie and his daughter, Diane, pose with another hardtop racing trophy, circa 1954. Flag emblem lettering C.B.C.R.A. indicates California Bay Cities Racing Association, part of the Bob Barkhimer-Jerry Piper hardtop racing circuit in Northern and Central California in the ’50s and ’60s.

When I called, a woman answered. “Is Blackie there?” “Murgadich, he’s not here.” The next day, I began, “So, Murgadich, how’s it goin’?”  Oh. Oh. Golden tiger eyes shot a bolt. “You little [expletive], if you ever call me that again, I’ll kill you.” Rule one. Fail to understand Blackie at your own peril. Later, I’d discover that it was Blackie’s mother, Ossanna, who answered, and, yes, she was a prankster. Murgadich (phonetically) is Armenian for “the Baptist.” Her little joke almost got me killed.

06 Hardtop racing poster from the early 50s featured Blackie as a main event draw but misspelled his name–Gejian
Hardtop racing poster from the early ’50s featured Blackie as a main event draw but misspelled his name–Gejian.

Blackie was a legend, both in his native Fresno and far beyond. For more than 51 years, he produced the Fresno Autorama. It was his show. He scoured the country; he picked the cars, gave the awards, and orchestrated the painterly spectacle. “I was the first showman to color code the cars,” he said.  His legacy in Fresno is celebrated by a plaque at the Fresno Convention Center and a permanent exhibit at The Big Fresno Fair. His hand and eye helped shape several landmark show cars, three of which won the coveted America’s Most Beautiful Roadster trophy at the Oakland Grand National Roadster Show: The “Ala Kart (with Richard Peters and George Barris), only two-time winner (1958/59); the ’29A “Emperor(with Chuck Krikorian, 1960); and his ’26 Model T Roadster, the “Shish Kebab Special (1955). The Shish Kebab would stand as a symbol of Blackie’s life of speed, style, and showmanship over seven decades. Chrome undercarriage aside, the T was the real deal: A dead-run hot rod that clocked out many a blacktop racers on Fresno backroads.

07 Blackies Model Model T Roadster in its 1947 iteration
Blackie’s Model Model T Roadster in its 1947 iteration. Early side valve block was equipped with a two-carb Thickstun intake manifold. The young woman passenger is Blackie’s wife, Mary Huston.

Racing History: Alex Xydias The Man Behind The Famous So-Cal Speed Shop

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He was a daring and sometimes reckless race car driver whose fiercely competitive spirit in the heyday of Central Valley hardtop racing shaped his sense of showmanship. He learned how to run big events and put the fans first.

08 Blackie won two successive Hanford 500 milers in 1954 and 1955
Blackie won two successive Hanford 500-milers (1954 and 1955). He’s shown here with his trophies and B. L. “Bircha” Marchbanks, a Texas cattleman who owned the track, which was alternatively known as Marchbanks Stadium and Hanford Motor Speedway. Marchbanks built the three-turn Big Car course on his sprawling cattle ranch in 1950.

He was 90 when his high-revving’ engine finally gave out in September 2016.

Blackie touched thousands and each has a story. There were elements of his life that might shed a timing light on the engine that drove the Blackie legend: his farm, his time racing hardtops, and his Armenian brotherhood in Fresno.

09 Another Gejeian racing victory this at a Kearney Bowl main event in 1954
Another Gejeian racing victory, this at a Kearney Bowl main event in 1954. Fellow racers and enthusiasts are Ed Welch, Fresno (standing), and kneeling left to right, Blackie, Archie Tucker, and Jack Frost, the latter two from Tranquility.

The Gejeian ranch, a 40-plus acre vineyard near Easton, was in the family since 1909, when a first wave of Armenian immigrants came to the Central Valley. His parents fled the Armenian genocide after World War I. The immigrant experience shaped Blackie’s early life. He remembered his large, extended family at the ranch house; grandparents, cousins, uncles, and aunts, and the gatherings on the veranda for music, food, and wine when the heat of the day began to recede. Writer William Saroyan would come out to talk life, people, and Armenian soul.

10The orange 1940 Ford Tudor that Blackie drove to a big win at Hanford in 1954
The orange 1940 Ford Tudor that Blackie drove to a big win at Hanford in 1954. He steered the entire race in a supine position after the car’s roof was crushed when he went over the top of the wall during qualifications.

“He was truly a farmer,” Carol Cusomano of Clovis says. She and her husband, Joe, were top International Show Car Association show car winners; she staged the world class tribute to Blackie at Fresno’s Convention Center in September 2016. In Blackie’s later years, the Cusomanos escorted him to shows, SEMA and rod and custom gatherings.

“On our way to events, he’d talk about the soil, the orchards, the vineyards. He loved the earth,” she recalls.

11 Central Valley circle track racing in the 50s was a bang em up chase around tight quarter mile circuits
Central Valley circle track racing in the ’50s was a bang ’em up chase around tight quarter-mile circuits from San Jose to Fresno’s Kearney Bowl. All-time regional hardtop racing champ Al Pombo (car #3) is nerfing an unidentified racer with his championship Chevy-powered hardtop.

Eugene Sadoian, “Clean Gene” to Blackie, was a lifelong and steadfast friend. The retired chief federal probation and parole officer, now 87, lives in Las Vegas. He remembers his first encounter at the ranch in 1948.

12 Fresnos Al Pombo was without a doubt the king of Central Valley circle track racing in the 50s and 60s
Fresno’s Al Pombo was without a doubt the king of Central Valley circle track racing in the ’50s and ’60s. He’s shown here with his #13 small block Chevy powered hardtop at Clovis Speedway, 1960.

“So, there I am, meeting the famous Blackie at his headquarters, but even more impressive was his father. Charles wore bib overalls, no shirt, always with a shovel in his hand and no shoes.

13 Marshall Sargent of Salinas CA was a hard charging and consistent race winner in early California circle track racing
Marshall Sargent, of Salinas, CA, was a hard-charging and consistent race winner in early California circle track racing. He and Fresno champion Al Pombo always put on a daring wheel-to-wheel show at dozens of small circuits up and down the Valley.

“The next time I was out there, Blackie was tearing around like a dirt tracker in his dad’s Model A. He spun and wiped out three rows of vines. Uh oh! Here comes dad with shovel in hand, storming barefoot through the vineyard. Blackie took off and didn’t come home that night.

14 George Ziggy Snider of Fresno and Bakersfield in his hardtop racer late 50s
George “Ziggy” Snider of Fresno and Bakersfield in his hardtop racer, late ’50s. Snider went on to compete at the Indianapolis 500 a record 22 times and in the late ’70s and early ’80s was a USAC Champ Car winner.

For a time, Ossanna had a psychic-hypnotist, Hyrkos, living at the ranch. According to Sadoian, his psychic powers seemingly passed to Blackie’s daughter, Diane.

15 Clyde Prickett was another circle track winner in the 50s
Clyde Prickett was another circle track winner in the ’50s.

Blackie’s day began at 3 a.m. when he fired his tractor and began tilling the vineyard. Then onto business, his show, track preparation, race car prep, racing. Restart. Seven days a week.

16 Herman Hutton of Selma running the Sno White Drive In Special at Kearney Bowl
Herman Hutton of Selma, running the Sno-White Drive-In Special at Kearney Bowl, late ’50s. Hutton sold Blackie and Richard Peters the original ’29 Ford Model T Roadster pickup that would become the Ala Kart two-time AMBR winner at Oakland.

“He came along to rival Billy Vukovich as a favorite son,” recalled late circle track racing promoter Bob Barkhimer. In 1949, “Barky” and fellow midget racer Jerry Piper, organized an intense Central Valley hardtop racing show on half- and quarter-mile dirt and paved tracks from San Jose to Clovis.

17 Blackie with the Emperor Roadster which in 1995 was part of his impressive collection
Blackie with the Emperor Roadster, which in 1995 was part of his impressive collection.

“Blackie drove an orange Ford coupe, (he) was a handsome devil with flashing eyes and black, curly hair . . . he had charisma galore, waved his arms all the time, and was excitable on and off the track. The fans loved him.”

18 Another landmark show car that was part of the Gejeian collection in 1995 the Mod Rod
Another landmark show car that was part of the Gejeian collection in 1995, the Mod Rod, which was created by Mike Haas and Art Himsl for the Larivee show car circuit in the ’70s.

Sadoian recalls a lot of those races. “He polarized the crowd. He brought them out to races even if he played the villain. I always worried because as a fastest qualifier, he started at the back. When the flag went down, he’d charge fearlessly through the pack; crash or no crash, he’d win. He put flaring bellows on his tailpipes and the noise alone would fire up the crowds.”

19 Clyde Palmer of Mt View CA with the Goularte Brothers hardtop racer late 50s
Clyde Palmer, of Mt. View, CA, with the Goularte Brothers hardtop racer, late ’50s.

Next we’ll look at Blackie’s growing organizational skills in producing and promoting motor racing events, his grand Fresno show, and his willingness to assist other motoring enthusiasts, all in part driven by his hard charging Armenian motoring brotherhood in Fresno.

Read More: Award Winning Metal Work: 1934 Chevy Roadster

20 Herman Hutton of Selma sold Blackie the 29 Model A Ford roadster pickup that would become the Ala Kart
Herman Hutton of Selma sold Blackie the ’29 Model A Ford roadster pickup that would become the Ala Kart, the only two-time AMBR show winner at the Oakland Roadster Show.

“There’ll never be another Blackie,” Fresno’s late Kenny Takeuchi, the dean of Central Valley track announcer, said. In an earlier interview before his death in 2019 at 92, “Tak” recalled his four decades as track announcer, historian, media manager, and statistician as well as his respect for Blackie’s diligence and attention to detail. “We had a four-track modified circuit. Friday night we’d race at Kearney Bowl, Saturday at San Jose, a Sunday day race at Altamont, and then close the series Sunday night at Clovis.

21 Hardtop racer Clyde Prickett
Hardtop racer Clyde Prickett.

“We had 60 cars, enough for A, B and C main events,” he said. “Blackie’s biggest fear was that there wouldn’t be enough cars and drivers left after three races; we raced the same cars, pavement, dirt, didn’t matter. Officials from San Jose and Altamont would have to high tail for Clovis. But we were good. We arrived on time and Blackie’s show was well run, well officiated, everyone in and out on time. The track was well prepared when we got there—no waitin’ around.

22 26 Model T Roadster that would not only become known as the Shish Kebob Special the 1955 AMBR winner
This is the probably the earliest view of the ’26 Model T Roadster that would not only become known as the Shish Kebob Special, the 1955 AMBR winner, but the car that would be perpetually identified with Blackie’s long dedication to the motoring arts. He’s shown here in Fresno with his best racing and rumblin’ buddy Amos Torosian, circa 1944-45.

But when he was upset his voice would carry a mile. That was time to clear out. Blackie was giving with counsel to anyone who loved cars as much as he did. “He was a teacher and mentor for Rick (Perry) and I after we took over the SF and Oakland events after Don’s (Tognotti) [death],” show manager, promoter, announcer, video, and voice impresario George Hague says.

23 This view from May 1947 preceded a daring rod run to Reno
Riding fast, far, and hard, Blackie and his sidekick, Amos Torosian, did fulfill in the ’40s the storied elements of true Road Rebels in the Blackie T. This view from May 1947 preceded a daring rod run to Reno. Blackie took on all challengers in night runs on the backroads of Fresno, even beating the Doane Spencer Deuce out of L.A.

Writer-historian and Pebble Beach judge Ken Gross remembers, “Blackie was unique. He was a perfectionist in every way. I can’t name too many people who had that perseverance, influence, and sheer energy.”

24 The transformation of Blackies T from wartime gow job to family conveyance to renegade race winner
The transformation of Blackie’s T from wartime gow job to family conveyance, to renegade race winner on Outlaw Highway–and eventually to America’s Most Beautiful Roadster in 1955–was a long process. Over the years, Blackie chromed every piece, piece by piece.

In 1997 Gross guided the Pebble Beach Concours judging committee to a show class for American hot rods and in 2001 Blackie entered the fully restored “Shish Kebab Special.”

25 Blackies T–not yet named the Shish Kebob Special–on the staging lot for the Oakland Roadster Show 1955
Blackie’s T–not yet named the “Shish Kebob Special”–on the staging lot for the Oakland Roadster Show, 1955.

“He wanted to win,” Gross recalls, “but got Third. He was hurt, always the quintessential competitor. But he’d taken liberties by reinstating some flaws. He’d even recreated some crooked seams in the T’s original leather.”

26 Once inside the Exhibition Hall for the 1955 Oakland Roadster Show Blackies T
Once inside the Exhibition Hall for the 1955 Oakland Roadster Show, Blackie’s T drew an immediate crew of admirers.

NHRA historian and curator Greg Sharp knew Blackie more than four decades. “He was bigger than life. He loved it all, racing, roadsters, shows. He was irrepressible, but he suffered a lot of medial setbacks in later years.”

27 Staging the Blackie T Exhibition Hall 1955 Oakland Grand National Roadster Show
Staging the Blackie T, Exhibition Hall, 1955 Oakland Grand National Roadster Show. His pride is tough to suppress; he loves the show.

There is no national or ethnic handle on motorsport excellence. But in Fresno in the late ’40s and ’50s, there was an all-consuming Armenian commitment to speed, the motoring arts, competition, and thriving automotive businesses.

28 Blackie center front with Oakland Show winners 1955
Blackie (center front) with Oakland Show winners, 1955. Others identified are (back row) Don Bell, Hayward, CA (standing second from left); Gene Winfield, Modesto, CA (fifth from right, with tie); and Ted Levinthal (second from right).

Blackie set the pace on the streets of downtown Fresno. He idolized USAC promoter J.C. Agajanian and was a feted guest at “Aggie’s” 100-mile invitational Open Championship at Ascot Speedway. Ed Iskenderian was born in Cutler over a century ago, but his dad went broke farming and they moved to L.A. Freddie Agabashian, from nearby Parlier, went to Oakland to be nearer the big car action. Harold Bagdasarian left Fresno to orchestrate his own car shows in Sacramento and Oakland.

29 With the trophy girl Oakland 1955
With the trophy girl, Oakland, 1955.

Eugene “Clean Gene” Sadoian remembers the racing brotherhood. “Blackie’s cousin, Richard Shirinian, had a candy orange A roadster, a channeled show and drag car. He bought the body and frame from Paul Soligian, who supplied orange paint for Blackie’s racing hardtops. Smokey Hanonian was the local Bowes Seal Fast distributor and was Blackie’s sponsor as well as a flagman at Clovis and Kearney Bowl. Mike Garabedian painted my ’34 and Blackie’s roadster. Sammy Arakelian was always hanging out at Blackie’s with his severely chopped blue ’36 Ford sedan, chrome dash, blue instruments. Ed “Shrimp” Koomjian ran Eddie’s Speed Shop. Joe Boghosian is now retired. He built most of Dan Gurney’s DOHC Ford engines for winning Coyote teams. His race engines powered everything fast–drag boats included.

30 A resplendent Mr Gejeian styles up to pose with the big AMBR trophy at Oakland 1955
A resplendent Mr. Gejeian styles up to pose with the big AMBR trophy at Oakland, 1955.

Racing History: Record-Breaking Race Team, Filmmaking, and Legacy

“Joe called Blackie sev shun, Armenian for ‘black dog’. There was no word we knew for fox; he just became black dog,” Sadoian says. “Fred DeOrian was Vukie’s mechanic. John Siroonian, owner of Western Wheels, had a beautiful collection of deuces. Won the big trophy at Oakland.”

31 27 Model T entered by Ray Anderegg of the Merced Rod Benders
In the Oakland Roadster Show’s only AMBR tie, Blackie’s Shish Kebob Special shared the winner’s circle in 1955 with a ’27 Model T entered by Ray Anderegg of the Merced Rod Benders.

Why did so many young Armenian men in Fresno get involved with hot cars, performance, and showmanship?

32 Reenacting the dramatic undercarriage reveal he staged in the Oakland show
Reenacting the dramatic undercarriage reveal he staged in the Oakland show–thereby earning this car its eternal nickname “Shish Kebob Special”—Blackie flipped the Model T on its side in a Fresno Park, 1955.

Dr. Barlow Der Mugrdechian, head of Armenian Studies at California State University, Fresno, didn’t have a specific answer about motor racing, but said, “Armenians will take a challenge. They’re bold and daring. It’s a cultural thing. They’ve heard about the old country and built this into their American identity. William Saroyan wrote about their willingness to take chances.”

33 Shish Kebob Special ran fast and strong with a 3 8x3 8 stroker 59AB Isky 404 Edelbrock heads and four 97s
Shish Kebob Special ran fast and strong with a 3/8×3/8 stroker 59AB, Isky 404, Edelbrock heads, and four 97s. Blackie did the engine work himself, “sometimes a port and relieve on the dining room table,” says longtime best buddy Eugene “Clean Gene” Sadoian. When Blackie took the car to the 1999 Bakersfield Reunion, he fired the Flattie for hot rod legend Art Chrisman, who, according to historian Greg Sharp, said, “Now, that’s what a flathead should sound like.”

Blackie took chances—on the tables, on the track, and in life.

“The competitive spirit is in the Armenian DNA,” John Alkire, former CEO of the Big Fresno Fair and now curator of the Fair’s history museum, says. He engineered a permanent exhibit in the museum about Blackie’s life in Fresno. The Gejeian diorama is crowned by a bronze bust of Blackie, one created by Fresno’s Debbie Stevenson.

34 Fresno motorsports award ceremony Civic Auditorium 1954
Fresno motorsports award ceremony, Civic Auditorium, 1954. Left to right: Blackie, Bill Vukovich, unidentified (jacket says Mark or Hank), unidentified, Bill Vukovich Jr., Harry Bellows, and Smokey Hanonian (Blackie’s hardtop racing sponsor).

“This was racing at a different level,” Alkire continues. “They had rough beginnings; they’re survivors. I was the CEO at King Speedway in Hanford (California), and the Armenian drivers were the most competitive, the most aggressive.”

35 With the Playboy models at the Oakland show 70s
With the Playboy models at the Oakland show, ’70s.

Hoss! Blackie knew thousands but remembered a few names. Hence, you were ‘Hoss.’ “Blackie, what was her name?” “Hoss!” And the golden tiger eyes would crinkle with joy.

36 Second from left is Detroit Autorama owner Bob Larrivee center is George Barris sunglasses and Blackie the Fresno Autorama producer
With other show promoters at a mid-’70s International Swim Coaches Association awards ceremony. Second from left is Detroit Autorama owner Bob Larrivee, center is George Barris (sunglasses), and Blackie, the Fresno Autorama producer.

When this reporter helped produce the Oakland Museum of California’s “Hot Rods and Customs” exhibition in 1996, Blackie generously loaned his Emperor roadster as a center stage feature car along with other AMBR winners in the museum’s Great Hall—plus, of course, the AMBR trophy itself. Midway through the press gathering at the show’s opening, Blackie sidled up, “Hoss, it’s too quiet in here.” I knew what he was up to and knew there’d be no stopping him. He returned with a battery, hooked it up, and fired the Caddy, open chrome headers, and raw petrol fumes. The roar was deafening; it set off fire alarms downtown. A museum lady came running down the stairs, crying, “Make it stop! Make it stop!”

37 Motoring journalist historian and museum curator Ken Gross was always appreciative of Blackie
Motoring journalist, historian, and museum curator Ken Gross was always appreciative of Blackie’s “energy, enthusiasm, and amazing drive,” and considered him a unique figure in modern American hot rodding and showmanship.

She never knew, of course, that there was no stop in Blackie’s life. MR

38 Oakland Roadster Show before the doors open in January 1990
Whenever it was show time, enthusiasts would gather around Blackie for advice or encouragement. He’s shown here with another group on the Coliseum floor of the Oakland Roadster Show before the doors open in January 1990.
39 With best buddy Sadoian for Blackies 60th birthday party in 1986
With best buddy, Sadoian, for Blackie’s 60th birthday party in 1986.
40Backstage at the 1959 Autorama
. Backstage at the 1959 Autorama. Those identified include Blackie (center), Eugene Sadoian (right), and Bob Enos (center left). Photo courtesy of Eugene Sadoian.
41 Another view of the Emperor Roadster 1960 AMBR winner at the Exposition Building in Oakland
Another view of the Emperor Roadster 1960 AMBR winner at the Exposition Building in Oakland. Photo from the Dobrin archives.
42 honored by this permanent plaque at the entrance to the Fresno Civic Auditoriumjpg
His contributions to Fresno’s motoring culture and the city’s history are honored by this permanent plaque at the entrance to the Fresno Civic Auditorium. Another favorite son, writer William Saroyan, is the only other Fresnan acknowledged at the Civic Center complex.
43 John Alkire now retired CEO of the Big Fresno Fair at the Fresno County Fairgrounds
John Alkire, now retired CEO of the Big Fresno Fair at the Fresno County Fairgrounds, was instrumental in producing a permanent diorama honoring Blackie and his life in Fresno in the fair’s history gallery. Alkire, who also had extensive experience managing motor racing complexes in the Valley, had a lot to say about Armenians and their competitive racing spirit.
44 The Gejeian history display at the Fresno County Fair features this bronze bust of Blackie
The Gejeian history display at the Fresno County Fair features this bronze bust of Blackie, one shaped by Fresno’s Debbie Stevenson, who has also completed a bust of famed Fresno writer William Saroyan.
45 Master engine builder Joe Boghosian here in 2017 with a Ford DOHC engine for the Gurney Coyote race team
Master engine builder Joe Boghosian (here in 2017 with a Ford DOHC engine for the Gurney Coyote race team) was among a group of young Armenian racers and hot rod enthusiasts who ran with Blackie in the ’50s. To Boghosian, Blackie was sev shun, Armenian for “black dog.” “We didn’t have a word for black fox,” he explained.
46 Ray and Carol Cusomanos sleek 54 Merc custom was a showstopper at the 2016 SEMA show
In all its “Gejeian Orange” glory, Ray and Carol Cusomano’s sleek ’54 Merc custom was a showstopper at the 2016 SEMA show, where it—and its new color—took center stage in the House of Kolor display.
47 Appropriate in every way Blackie too was a fighter
There’s a Greek sculpture in the Louvre in Paris called “The Boxers.” When this correspondent’s wife saw the figure facing the viewers she said, “Look like anyone you know?” A powerful trick in time. The high cheekbones, the distinctive tonsorial sweep, the competitive tiger-eyed stare. Appropriate in every way. Blackie too was a fighter.
48 one of Blackies award winning roadsters
At the time of his death, Blackie had an impressive collection of AMBR-winning roadsters. They have all since been sold to private owners and we can only hope the new caretakers of this amazing collection of history will enjoy and continue to share these hot rods with the rest of the rodding world.

49 unique build of a classic roadster 50 Blackie s unique style is timeless 52 no two roadster in Blackies collection are the same 51 Blackie s roadsters are historic 53 eye catching roadster from Blackies collection 54 Attention to detail is shown in this roadster 55 Blackie certainly had plenty of style to give each roadster 56 a simple design roadster from Blackie 57 Blackies award winning roadster collection lives on in their new owners

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